The battle against depression...


I remember, as a teenager, struggling with depression. These days i've got it under control by reading and reading. It's not something you enjoy having to deal with. It's an awful condition you have no control over. It takes over your life and makes it difficult to live with, making the most simplest of decisions a matter of life and death. These days it's known as an illness and more and more people get help from their doctor. Back in the s 70s and 80s you had to fend for yourselves although i'm sure that it was a condition you could get help for.

The best man at my wedding has depression and i didn't even know ihe he has t, but it's a serious condition that you never really lose. You can deal with it though. I used to deal with it by going on long runs; by cooking;; by playing cricket; by spending hours cleaning out a room. There are other ways. You can take your dog for a walk, go fishing or strum your guitar. Just do something that is really active. It doesn't matter how famous you are or how much money you've got, Deppression will strike anybody.. My best man at the wedding is as goodlooking as anybody else. I've known him for years and he's the last person you'd thought would suffer from depression.

Depression is more than simply feeling unhappy or fed up for a few days.
Most people go through periods of feeling down, but when you're depressed you feel persistently sad for weeks or months, rather than just a few days.
Some people think depression is trivial and not a genuine health condition. They're wrong – it is a real illness with real symptoms. Depression isn't a sign of weakness or something you can "snap out of" by "pulling yourself together".
The good news is that with the right treatment and support, most people with depression can make a full recovery.

It's important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.
Many people wait a long time before seeking help for depression, but it's best not to delay. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can be on the way to recovery.

Comments

  1. Treey', thanks for your comment on my blog and for being interested to read my old posts. I guess it's a good way to get to know more about me.

    My son suffers from depression and his dad is not able to really understand how it really affect him. Suffering from depression isn't trivial. It's absolutely major... The whole body is affected by depression, the whole person is affected. A lot of people don't realize it, even the educated ones...
    Hugs, Julia

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  2. Hi Julia,

    It's taken a lot more seriously than it used to be. Your posts are very readable. That's a good start.
    I wish I'd told the doctor about it years ago. It would have been better. Instead, I thought I knew better. Like I always do.
    .

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  3. Excellent points. Depression does not discriminate; it'll make anyone ill. We have come a long way but there is still a stigma attached to depression. Hopefully we keep moving forward. I had postpartum depression after my first child and had to be hospitalized for little while. My family was extremely supportive. Another woman was admitted when I was getting ready to go home and no one came to see her because they were ashamed. Can you imagine? It was very sad for her, and made her recovery that much more difficult.

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  4. Yes, we have come a long way. Not before time, Martha.

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  5. I've been depressed my entire life it seems. I've been feeling this way since I was about 9 years old. At that time in my 9 year old head I thought that if I swallowed these tiny nails that they would somehow end up in my blood steam and pierce my heart. So I stuck 4 nails in 4 pieces of meat and swallowed them. Nothing happened and when I told my grandma, she took me to the doctor who said they 'passed' on their own. Grandma told me not to tell my parents and that was the end of it. I think she and the doctor really dropped the ball on that one. I'm a bit better at dealing with depression these days but it's always there.

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  6. I used to deal with it by being Beatle- crazy when I was 18. They were a 'forgotten' band in 70s. When John Lennon was shot in 1980 it sparked a Beatles revival and they became well-known again. You can never win!

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  7. I used to drop down a black hole in the middle of winter but I'm much more positive now. Not exactly depression I know. But someone in my family suffers from depression. They've been offered medication and refused . Now we're all gently pushing. The doc explained that the medication would not only make them feel better and sleep better but their whole body health would improve as well.

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    1. Any experiences you have of depression are welcome.

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  8. I like your advice about being active when you're feeling down - doing something instead of wallowing in your depression. To me that's better than all the pills in the world.

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    1. I'd rather not take pills your body doesn't need. I take enough when I take my Meds.

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  9. You are right about being active to help with depression. In my case I need medication. The medication also helps with my epilepsy.

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    1. Medication should never be ruled out. Leading an active lifestyle also helps.

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  10. Sadly far too many people feel that the 'snap out of it' advice is a cure-all for mental illness. It isn't.
    Exercise/distraction can help. Sometimes it is a matter of waiting the beast out, sometimes medication is required. And depression/anxiety will return. They are skilled and successful liars too.

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    1. I only did the post because I know what it feels like. Thanks for the tips.

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  11. Depression should never be trivialised. And, sadly, there are many among us who ignorantly scoff at the mention of depression.

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  12. Well, hopefully it will get better in the future. Obviously it's a very difficult situation to discuss.

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  13. I've suffered depression off and on during my life but never wanted medical help, as I'm terrified of doctors, so I just keep busy until I can climb out of the hole again. Music is my biggest comfort.

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  14. I find that popping pills is not as effective as being more natural.

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  15. I've only been depressed once after I had a miscarriage at about 5 months pregnant because of a carbon monoxide leak in our basement where I did laundry. It was awful so I can't imagine how it would be if it was a chronic condition. You seem to have coped very well and I know if I ever feel self pity (every once in awhile) I work hard physically like I am trying to purge my system of any negative thoughts but overall I am blessed to have an overabundance of whatever that chemical is in your brain that makes you happy. I wish I could share some with you! People have actually gotten nasty with me about being "little miss sunshine' but I can't help it just like others can't help being depressed. Not that I would trade. You sound like you fight the good fight on a daily basis and it sounds like you are winning! I've heard St. John's Wort is good. It comes in a tea and is natural. You probably already know about that. I will pray that your days are light hearted and happy from now on. Take care my friend!

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  16. P.S. What's a "wanker"? I'm from the states and I've never heard that...it must be a British term. Love the U.K with all your natural beauty and those walking trails....no barbed wire! Plus, you were so smart not to let Trump visit! LOL! I wish we could export him to the moon! Evidently there is no psychological evaluation done for being President of the U.S. as the man is definitely ill and needs professional help but no one will tell the King he is not wearing any clothes! LOL!

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    1. "Wank" is a slang term for masturbate. I am not sure if Americans engage in this leisure activity.

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  17. A "wanker" is not something you want to called. Ever!! Why does everyone dislike Trump so much? He seems okay to me. What do I know?

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  18. Hi Terry, nice post :) Well, I do suffer depression and though I did do 7 years on meds and a total of 9 in therapy, the costs are too high now, so I manage as best I can on my own. I keep as busy as possible - especially in the winter when it gets worse. It's true that moving around helps (walking the dogs and exercising); so does keeping my mind busy. Anxiety goes hand in hand as well, so relaxation exercises also help. I have cut lots of people out of my life for taking my illness as a triviality - that you are very right about. Not to offend anyone, but my experience is that if a disability isn't seen, it's not taken seriously. It promotes shame and hiding and more people suffer due to that. That's why I'm so open about what I go through, I NEVER want to feel shame for something that is out of my control. And I remember going to see my family doctor back in 1987, telling him I felt sad a lot, and felt like I was dying...couldn't catch my breath at times...his words QUOTE: "There's nothing wrong with you, it's all in your head, I can't help you."...little did I know at age 18 I was suffering depression and anxiety. Damn Quack.

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    1. I know how bad depression is. It's like a disability in that you have to go through it to know how bad it can be. If you don't suffer from it you're very fortunate. It isn't something you can just 'snap out of' at all. I wish it was, because my life would have been so different if it had. The number of times it left me crying is something I don't want to spend time thinking about.

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  19. I get seasonal depression; not usually serious except that I have to make a huge effort to combat it during the short days of winter. I should probably go the Florida or California but I tend to lose my motivation and just blunder through. Good luck to you.

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    1. Hi Linda,

      I hope you manage it and don't get too stressed out.

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  20. My dear Terry...thanks so much for thinking of me and coming to tell me. I've never suffered from depression in my whole life but when my husband of 57 years passed away on July 11th, I must have been in a depressed state because I cried night and day...I am better now...but not by much. I guess it takes awhile to start breathing again after losing one you love so dearly.
    Love to you!

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    1. hello bj, I hope you are feeling as well as could be expected. It was a terrible shock what happened to you. You are in my thoughts and prayers at this terrible time.

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  21. I've never suffered from serious, all-out depression but I know several people who do and I know it's a dreadful experience for them. I think what's especially hard is that they've tried all sorts of remedies and treatments over the years but still depression unexpectedly overwhelms them and they have to go through the same misery yet again.

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    1. Hi Nick. Thanks for taking part. It's a terrible illness to have. I know because I have suffered from it a lot since I was a kid.

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    2. I'm sorry you've had to deal with depression all your life. I feel fortunate to not have experienced it myself (although it could happen to any of us at any time) but I have loved ones - one very close to me - who deal with it, so I know something of the nature of it. If more people spoke out, it would help make it more acceptable, provide moral support for others who suffer, and hopefully encourage researchers to work harder to find the causes and cures that are needed. Hopefully one day, hopefully soon.

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    3. That was meant to be a new comment, not a reply to Nick!

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  22. It's brave of you to share this so openly and honestly. Wishing you good fortune.

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