Not being able to talk


The BBC are showing a video of someone who suffers from a locked in syndrome. It tells the story of a man who got the syndrome when he was just 12 years old. He is now married and has a baby on the way. I don’t know how that happened. Neither does he. It’s a strange story of someone who found the ability to communicate. His parents didn’t know he was in there, so it was amazing fot them that he was.

He has written a book about his life as a disabled person but i’m in no mad rush to read it. I’ve experienced enough of life to last me a forever. It’s definitely an uphill struggle. There’s no doubt about that. My story is one of being unable to walk. It’s a struggle to learn to get used to it. How do you cope with it? A big part of your life is taken away from you when you lose your legs. I used to think i could walk but soon found i couldn’t when i jumped out of my wheelchair and found that i was unable to.

Raising my good arm so that i can drink is also a problem. I don’t know why but i can’t raise it in the aternoon. I lose all the strength to do it so i have to drink as much as i can in the morning to make up for it. I just drink water. That’s all i drink. Caffeine keeps me awake at night so i don’t drink it through choice.
i understand what this man is going through, but i see people who are having a much harder time of it.

They can’t choose anything not even what they’d like to do let alone have sex with a woman and bring a new life into the world.

Comments

  1. For now I use a wheelchair and am working my way up to a walker. I can see how hard it must be to not be able to walk at all.
    Take care.

    ReplyDelete
  2. And a hiss and spit to all those who describe disabilities as 'challenges'. They are often mountains which make Everest seem small.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We often do them alone. Here, they talk about holidays. What is a holiday? I haven’t had one of those for five years.

      Delete
    2. ha! holidays! a relative of mine has a holiday house she keeps begging me to use but has no clue that leaving my own home makes life even more complicated and I just don't want to bother. Take my challenges to a different house and add more "challenges"?
      Someday maybe but not now.

      Delete
    3. It’s difficult, but no-one ever said life was easy.

      Delete
    4. We had a Prime Minister who said Life wasn't meant to be easy!

      Delete
    5. He or she was talking about me I think.

      Delete
  3. There are so many ways to lose abilities. It is sobering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes there are, Jenny. Some people are far worse off
      than me. It doesn’t feel like it though.

      Delete
  4. Every case of disability has it's own problems that we, mobile people can't even imagine. I think we should be very grateful that we are mobile and can talk and not take it for granted. Someday, it may be us in a wheelchair having to depend on someone else for our every needs.
    It takes a lot of courage and surrender to live in a wheelchair and to depend on someone for help.
    It must be the most frustrating thing ever.
    Hugs, Julia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Julia, we looked to see if we could find Energy Vampire in the library. No luck.

      Delete
    2. Hi Terry. The book, Dodging Energy Vampires by Christiane Northrup came out just recently so maybe it's not in the libraries yet. You can read a lot about energy vampires on the internet and also about empaths. I like anything that deals with the mind and I find it very interesting.
      Hugs.

      Delete
    3. Hi Julia, I asked for it and couldn’t get it.

      Delete
  5. So much we take for granted...and no matter how active an imagination we might have we can't imagine how we would cope with, handle the problems you and others have to deal with day after day...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a problem and I can’t handle it.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts